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Programs : Brochure

This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
Fact Sheet:
Education Abroad Adviser:
Erica Nikolaisen
Minimum GPA:
2.6
Class Standing:
1 - First Year
Grad/Undergrad:
Undergraduate
Language of Instruction:
English
Language Requirement:
0 semesters
Internship Available:
No
Fields of Study:
Agricultural Sciences, Biology, Ecosystems, Environmental Studies, Science, Sustainability
Program Description:

Overview

Eligibility

  • 18 years of age or above
  • Good academic and disciplinary standing at Penn State
  • 2.6 cumulative GPA or better at the time of application
  • Sophomore standing or above at the start of the program 

Program Description 

Step beyond the tourist experience in East Africa. Spend one or two sessions with Tanzania’s charismatic wildlife – from magnificent lions and elephants to thunderous herds of wildebeest and graceful gazelles. Students can participate in one or both sessions and will earn 4 credits per session.

Summer Session I: Fundamentals of Wildlife Management

In this two-country fundamentals course, the world-famous national parks and reserves of Kenya and Tanzania are your classrooms. Through safari drives and field excursions, study wildlife found nowhere else on the planet – in person. Discuss different approaches to wildlife management and conservation, and learn about traditional knowledge and culture from Maasai and other community groups. Embark on multi-day camping expedition to Serengeti National Park (Tanzania) with a stop at the Ngorongoro Conservation Area en route to learn about migratory corridors and explore the giant crater. You will also explore Amboseli National Park (Kenya), based in the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, and observe wildlife behavior, practice species ID, and collect ecological data.

There are two options for Summer Session II:

Carnivores of the African Plains in Tanzania

Tanzania is home to more than 35 species of carnivores, , including the African lion, cheetah, leopard, and wild dog – all of which are on the IUCN Red List. Study the behavioral ecology and conservation challenges facing these incredible creatures, while observing some of Africa’s largest remaining carnivore guilds up close.Visit the Tarangire Lion Project to learn from leading lion researchers and analyze pride population dynamics and individual behavior using radio telemetry and camera trapping data.

Primates of the African Savanna in Kenya

Primates are some of the most intelligent species on the planet and a fascinating case study on animal behavior. Venture into Kenya’s national parks to study these complex, social creatures. Through field observations and research, learn about the ecology and behavior of Syke’s, colobus, and vervet monkeys, bush babies, and yellow and olive baboons as well as human-wildlife conflict and conservation issues. Embark on an overnight camping expedition to Tsavo National Park, where you’ll see primates, elephants, wildebeests, and carnivores in their natural habitat

This academically rigorous program follows a six-day/week schedule. The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to help students actively discover and understand the complexities of environmental, social, and economic issues in Tanzania.

Major academic themes include:

  • Behavioral ecology
  • Field ornithology
  • Human-wildlife conflict
  • Community conservation approaches
  • Wildlife and natural resource management policies

Dates

Summer Session 1: early June - early July
Summer Session II: early July - early August

Refer to the program website for the specific dates, if available. 

Location

Located on the escarpment of Tanzania’s Great Rift Valley, the SFS Center for Wildlife Management Studies is situated near critical savanna ecosystems. Within a short drive from the Center are Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Serengeti National Park, Lake Manyara National Park, Tarangire National Park, as well as many community conservation areas and wildlife migration corridors. The town of Karatu is located only 15 minutes from the Center, this growing town is a great place to go on the weekends. It offers groceries, a medical clinic, a pub, an organic coffee farm, and of course the famed elephant caves, where you might be lucky enough to spot an elephant mining consumable minerals from the hillsides.

Arusha is the closest large city in the region. Here, you’ll find shops, restaurants, and all the conveniences of an urban area, while Arusha National Park and volcanic Mt. Meru provide incredible scenery and wildlife viewing opportunities.

Education Abroad in Countries with a Penn State Restricted Travel Designation

In order to comply with Penn State’s International Travel Policy, students interested in studying abroad in countries that Penn State has designated as “restricted” for travel, a petition for a waiver must be submitted. Once a petition is complete, and if the student is approved for study on the program in question, the student may be asked to meet with the Director of Education Abroad and the petition will be reviewed by the Penn State International Restricted Travel Committee (IRTC). The necessary petition will be included in the online application process for this program. To see if your program is taking place in a restricted travel country, please visit the Global Programs website.

Academics

Available Fields of Study

Agricultural Sciences, Biology, Ecosystems, Environmental Studies, Science, Sustainability

Course Listings

To find courses on the SFS: Tanzania, Wildlife Management & Conservation program, follow the instructions on the host program page.

To see what Penn State students have previously taken on this program, see the Historical Course List, which is meant to be a guide as to what courses might be available and how they might transfer to Penn State. Courses listed here may not be offered during the semester you attend the program and the credit amount or course title may have changed. 

Note: You are not limited to choosing classes on the program Historical Course List. You should consult the full list of courses on the host program page before choosing a program.

Course Selection

To find appropriate courses that will fit into your degree requirements, you will need to work with your academic adviser. Suggested tips:
  • Research courses available on your program
  • Meet with your academic adviser to discuss potential courses abroad and your degree requirements 
  • Keep in mind that courses abroad may change or may be unavailable for your selected term, so you will need to discuss possible back-up course options
  • To register for courses on this program you will work with your host program
Summer Session I: Fundamentals of Wildlife Management
  • SFS 3500 Wildlife Management and Conservation (4 credits)
Summer Session II: Carnivores of the African Plains
  • SFS 3121 African Large Carnivores: Ecology and Conservation (4 credits)
These courses are participatory in nature and designed to foster inquiry and active learning combining lectures, field exercises, assignments, and tests. Both course are taught in English.

Academic Policies

  • You must enroll in a minimum number of 4 credits if participating in only one session and a maximum number of 8 credits if participating in two sessions
  • You cannot take any courses abroad on a Pass/Fail basis
  • World Campus courses should not be taken in addition to or as a substitute for courses offered abroad
  • You may not take sport or physical activity courses (e.g. sailing, bowling, yoga, etc.) abroad
  • If you are studying abroad in your final semester at Penn State, please note that Penn State may not receive your grades in time for graduation 

Course Equivalency Process

In order for courses from abroad to appear on your Penn State transcript, each course must be given a course equivalency. Please visit the Academics section of the Global Programs website for information on the course equivalency process.  

Courses can be submitted for course equivalency before, during, or after the education abroad program, however, you should begin this process as soon as possible as it can take on average 2-4 months or more for courses to receive a Penn State course number. In some cases, it can be difficult to obtain syllabi from abroad before the start of the term, but when possible, courses can be submitted for review before departure. Talk to your Education Abroad Adviser about requesting syllabi.

Grade and Credit Conversion Scale

Grades and credit conversions from your host institution cannot be changed. They will be converted to Penn State credits and grades based on the following scales:
 
Grade Conversion Scale
Host Institution Grade Penn State Grade
 A A
 A- A-
 B+ B+
 B B
 B- B-
 C+ C+
 C C
 D D
 F F
 
Credit Conversion Scale
Host Institution Credit Penn State Credit
 4 Credits  4 Credits
 
 

Housing and Meals

Housing

Housing is included as part of the program. Learn to live the pole pole lifestyle at SFS’ Moyo Hill Camp. Surrounded by Tanzania’s world-famous national parks and wildlife, it’s the perfect base camp for expeditions into the field. Campus is reminiscent of summer camp, with plenty of outdoor and communal spaces, while the small, friendly community of Rhotia is a short walk away.
  • Dorm living in 4-person bandas (cabins)
  • Classroom, library, and computer lab
  • Kitchen and dining hall, on-site cooking staff
  • Volleyball, gazebo, fire pit, and lounge areas
  • Community soccer games and local running routes

Independent housing is not permitted on this program. There will be no exceptions. 

Meals

Most meals are included in the cost of the program. The meals at the SFS Center are healthy and well-balanced, and the portions are plentiful. The typical lunch and dinner will consist of a spread of fresh fruits and vegetables, a carbohydrate option, a protein option, and occasionally a dessert. There is usually a delicious selection of fruits such as mango, pineapple, watermelon, apples, bananas, and passion fruit to look forward to. Expect familiar meals such as pasta dishes, curried or roasted vegetables, pizza, lentils, rice, beans, potato dishes, maize, and meat. In a country famed for its "nyama choma" or roast meat, it is not surprising that most East Africans love to eat meat. You can expect a variety of meat dishes including beef, goat, fish, chicken, and pork. In addition to meat, you will regularly be treated to novel East African vegetarian favorites such as chapatti (flat bread), sukuma wiki (collard greens), and mandazi (fried dough/donuts).

Breakfasts usually include eggs, pancakes, toast, French toast, porridge, cereal, bacon or sausages, and sometimes hot cinnamon buns. Packed lunches during field exercises always include chopped veggies, peanut butter and jelly, and sometimes cheese, and hard-boiled eggs.

While you will probably be familiar with most dishes and their ingredients, the actual food preparation differs somewhat from the Western norm. Dishes prepared in East Africa – whether they are traditional or Western – tend to be cooked with a greater amount of oil than you might be used to. For those individuals who maintain a strict "fat-free" diet or prefer fat-free foods, the food preparation in East Africa will require you to be flexible and open-minded.

Costs and Funding

Program Costs

Summer Costs

The cost of a program is based on Penn State tuition rates and partner institution fees. Due to the variety of locations and partner institutions, costs will vary depending on the program. Education Abroad works closely with our partners to ensure the most accurate cost estimates, however, fees can change quickly and without prior notice. Consult the cost sheets for your chosen program often and if you have any questions please contact your Education Abroad Adviser.

Scholarships 

The Education Abroad Office awards a number of grants and scholarships to students who participate in an education abroad program through Global Programs. The application for the scholarships awarded through the Education Abroad Office is included with your program application. Eligibility is based on academic merit and/or financial need. You must have a current FAFSA on file to be awarded. There are additional scholarship opportunities through our partner universities, Penn State Academic Departments, and other sources. To view a full list of scholarships, eligibility requirements, and deadlines visit Funding Study Abroad.

Program Specific Scholarships and Funding Opportunities

All students are welcome to apply for SFS need-based financial aid. Students who exhibit financial need for their program will be offered SFS financial aid. SFS aid is offered through a combination of scholarships, grants and loans. Visit the Financial Aid section of SFS website for more information.

Student Aid

Penn State students who plan to study on a Penn State approved program can use most forms of financial aid towards the cost of the program. Exceptions include work-study awards and some athletic scholarships. If you have specific questions regarding your aid awards, contact the Penn State Office of Student Aid

Withdrawal & Refund Policy 

Withdrawal and refund details are dependent on the timing and reason for your withdrawal from a Penn State Education Abroad Program. For specific details and steps on how to withdraw, read the Education Abroad Policies

After Commitment

Once a student has committed to a Penn State Education Abroad program, they are financially responsible for any fees incurred on their behalf. Therefore, if a student plans to withdraw from a program it is their responsibility to immediately notify the Education Abroad office, in writing; email is preferred. 

Regardless of the timing or reason for the withdrawal, the student will be responsible for paying the Education Abroad Administrative Fees. Additional fees from the partner institution will be assessed according to their withdrawal and refund policies at the date of the withdrawal notice.

After the Start of the Program 

If a student withdraws after the start of a program, any adjustment of Penn State tuition charges will be made according to the Tuition Adjustment Schedule as determined by the Office of the Bursar. Students may be responsible for up to 100% of program costs. In most cases, partial credit cannot be awarded for leaving a program before its successful completion.

For additional information on withdrawal policies, separate and apart from financial consequences, please consult the University Senate Policy on Withdrawal and Leave of Absence.
 

Life Abroad

General Information 

Studying abroad can be one of the most exciting and transformative experiences of your college career. It is an opportunity to develop independence, build cross-cultural competencies, grow as a person, and enhance your academic program. Entering a new culture can be challenging for everyone. You may ask yourself: is this the right country for me? What are their cultural norms? How will my identity be perceived there? What can I do to prepare for this experience? What will my daily life be like? Below are resources to help you answer these questions.

Accessibility 

Penn State Education Abroad works closely with campus resources and our partner institutions around the world to ensure that students of all abilities reach their goal of studying abroad. While we cannot guarantee the accessibility of all program sites and locations, specific accommodations may be arranged on an individual basis. If you have accommodation needs or further questions please consult with the Student Disability Resources office and your Education Abroad Adviser. Additional resources are available through the Global Program Website. Disability information will not be used during the admissions process, but rather is meant to provide students with resources to help in planning a successful experience abroad.


Program Specific Accessibility Information

Students requesting physical and health accommodations should contact the SFS Safety and Student Life Department. Students requesting learning accommodations should contact the SFS Office of Academic Affairs. SFS will work with students, home institutions, and physicians to determine the required level of accommodation and whether or not it can be safely and reasonably maintained on program. While SFS strives to make accommodations for most disabilities, due to the remote nature of the programs, there are varying levels of accessibility, services, and accommodations at each SFS center. 

Fieldwork by its very nature is physically arduous: the days are long, the traveling seldom comfortable, and creature comforts generally lacking. The program involves a few fairly strenuous hikes as part of the academic program, so physical conditioning is strongly advised. In order to withstand the pace and rigors of the program as well as any “foreign” health risks of the country, it is strongly advised that you be in good physical health. Due to the humidity and temperatures, SFS has noted that chronic health problems often flare up, even if they are under control in the U.S. You should discuss such conditions seriously with your physician and SFS Admissions or the SFS Safety and Student Life Department to see if this SFS program will be right for you

Gender and LGBTQA

There are dramatic and subtle differences in how gender, identity, sexual expression, and sexual health are perceived in different countries. Before going abroad, it is important that you research the specific country or countries you will be visiting and have a full understanding of their cultural norms. Below are some resources to help you with that research and provide guidance for your life abroad.

Race, Ethnicity, and Faith

When choosing a study abroad location and preparing for your travels, you will want to be mindful of how your experience will be different than what you are used to in the United States. Your racial, ethnic, and spiritual identities may be interacted with and labeled by others differently than what you expect. Here are resources to help you prepare for these differences.

Non-U.S. Citizens

It is possible for non-U.S. Citizens to study abroad through Penn State. To do so successfully, you must plan early because this process may involve obtaining visas and other governmental procedures. Check with your DISSA Adviser prior to committing to a study abroad program and speak with your Education Abroad Adviser for specific information on the host country. If you plan on traveling to other countries during your study abroad experience, you will need to research and make plans to adhere to immigration policies for all of the countries that you plan to travel to and through. You are responsible for applying for visas for all applicable countries on your own. Advisers in the Education Abroad office cannot apply for your visa for you. Additional information may be available through your country's embassy and the consulate for your study abroad country.
 

Next Steps

Steps to Study Abroad

The planning stages outlined on the Global Programs website will help you have the best study abroad experience possible. We recommend that you begin this process at least one year prior to the semester you plan on studying abroad. Visit the Steps to Study Abroad section of the Global Penn State website. 

How to Apply

Click the “Apply Now” button on this page to get started!

Application procedures can vary by program. Students should consult the application instructions available within each application. For more information, see the Application Process section of the Global Penn State website. 

Deadlines

You must apply to this program by the Penn State deadline. For a list of deadlines visit the Application Process page of the Global Programs website.

Contact Education Abroad 

If you have general questions about Education Abroad opportunities at Penn State, please email EducationAbroad@psu.edu.

Peer Advisers

Education Abroad Peer Advisers are Penn State study abroad returnees who advise students on education abroad opportunities at Penn State. Each Peer Adviser can explain program options, give an overview of the study abroad process, as well as provide information about their experience abroad. Peer Advisers have walk-in hours in Boucke Building during the fall and spring semester when classes are in session. For more information, visit the Education Abroad Peer Adviser website. 

Education Abroad Advisers 

Education Abroad Advisers can provide information about courses, support services, application processes, housing details, program costs, cultural expectations, pre-departure requirements, and much more. Education Abroad Advisers have two types of meetings - scheduled appointments and walk-ins. For more information about how to meet with an Education Abroad Adviser, please visit the Global Penn State website

Social Media

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For information about upcoming events, scholarship opportunities, deadlines, and much more visit the Global Programs Events Calendar and follow us on social media!
 


Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Summer 2019 02/01/2019
02/13/2019 06/03/2019 08/07/2019
NOTE: Start date marks arrival in host country. End date marks departure from program housing. Dates listed are for students who complete both sessions of the program; student who do not complete both sessions will have different program dates and should check with SFS for confirmation before purchasing airline tickets.
Summer 2020 02/01/2020 02/12/2020 TBA TBA

Indicates that deadline has passed